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   Apache FAQ > B. General Technical Questions
Question:  Is Apache Year 2000 compliant?
Answer:

Yes, Apache is Year 2000 compliant.

Apache internally never stores years as two digits. On the HTTP protocol level RFC1123-style addresses are generated which is the only format a HTTP/1.1-compliant server should generate. To be compatible with older applications Apache recognizes ANSI C's asctime() and RFC850-/RFC1036-style date formats, too. The asctime() format uses four-digit years, but the RFC850 and RFC1036 date formats only define a two-digit year. If Apache sees such a date with a value less than 70 it assumes that the century is 20 rather than 19.

Although Apache is Year 2000 compliant, you may still get problems if the underlying OS has problems with dates past year 2000 (e.g., OS calls which accept or return year numbers). Most (UNIX) systems store dates internally as signed 32-bit integers which contain the number of seconds since 1st January 1970, so the magic boundary to worry about is the year 2038 and not 2000. But modern operating systems shouldn't cause any trouble at all.

Users of Apache 1.2.x should upgrade to a current version of Apache 1.3 (see year-2000 improvements in Apache 1.3 for details).

The Apache HTTP Server project is an open-source software product of the Apache Software Foundation. The project and the Foundation cannot offer legal assurances regarding any suitability of the software for your application. There are several commercial Apache support organizations and derivative server products available that may be able to stand behind the software and provide you with any assurances you may require. You may find links to some of these vendors at <http://www.apache.org/info/support.cgi>.

The Apache HTTP server software is distributed with the following disclaimer, found in the software license:

   THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE APACHE GROUP "AS IS" AND ANY
   EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
   IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
   PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE APACHE GROUP OR
   ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
   SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
   NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES;
   LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
   HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT,
   STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE)
   ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED
   OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

This FAQ is from Apache Server Frequently Asked Questions

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